5 Things Community Banks and Credit Unions Should Budget for in 2020

5 Things Community Banks and Credit Unions Should Budget for in 2020

The final months of the year signal the beginning of many traditions. For community banks and credit unions, the Fall marks the start of budget season. Financial institutions use this time to assess the year’s performance, make necessary adjustments—or full upgrades—for 2020 and beyond.

As you know, technology and security are constantly evolving, and compliance continues to be a moving target, so it’s time to consider important areas your institution needs to budget for in the next year. To ensure that your institution heads into 2020 on an upward trajectory, here are five key items to include on your list.

  1. Hardware
  2. Every year hardware should be evaluated to see if it is under warranty; in good working condition; and that the operating system hasn’t reached end of life.

    Two dates to be aware of:

    • SQL Server 2008 R2 reached end of life on 7/9/2019
    • Windows Server 2008 and 2008 R2 reach end of life on January 14, 2020

    These items will need to be upgraded or replaced as soon as possible with supported software. If the decision is to replace a server based on these products being end of life, there are options to consider as covered in number 2 in this article.

  3. Cloud vs. In-house Infrastructure
  4. Free eBookEverything You Need to Know About the Cloud Get a Copy

    Moving internal infrastructure out of the office is the new trend. This move feels similar to the move to virtualization, in that everyone agrees this is the next logical step in the evolution of computing. You should be asking the same question about cloud infrastructure as you did about virtualization—when is the right time for your institution to make the move and what are the pros and cons of this move? When the time comes to replace pieces of your infrastructure, start to gather information about the benefits of moving to the cloud and the costs associated with it. Remember, each server has both direct and indirect costs.

    Direct:

    • Server Hardware
    • Warranty
    • Software

    Indirect:

    • Electricity
    • Cooling
    • Storage/physical space
    • Maintenance
    • Backup
    • Disaster Recovery

    Each year as hardware becomes outdated and needs to be replaced, evaluate whether moving that server to the Cloud makes sense. Be sure that the functions of the server can be accomplished in a cloud environment. Once a presence in the cloud is established, future growth and changes become much easier and quicker.

  5. Firewalls
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    Firewalls continue to evolve as network and cybersecurity threats evolve and change. Ten years ago, adding intrusion prevention systems (IPS) to firewalls became commonplace in the industry. Now there are a host of new features that can be added to your firewall to improve your institution’s security posture. Many of these fall under products using the term next-gen firewalls. A few key features to consider include:

    • Secure Sockets Layer, or SSL, is the industry standard for transmitting secure data over the internet. The good news is most websites on the internet now use SSL to secure the traffic between the PC and the website. The bad news is, your firewall may be protecting your institution from fewer sites than ever before. Google researchers found that 85% of the websites visited by people using the Chrome browser are sites encrypted with SSL. This means that for many firewalls, 85% of web traffic cannot be inspected by the firewall. Many firewalls can perform SSL inspection but may require a model with more capacity; a new license to activate the feature; and configuration changes to enable this feature to work.
    • Sandbox analysis is a security mechanism used to analyze suspect data and execute it in a sandbox environment to evaluate its behavior. This is a great feature to introduce to your infrastructure because it provides more testing and insight into the data coming into your institution.
    • Threat intelligence feeds (like FS ISAC), built-in network automation, and correlation alerting are also important features that can help you keep track of emerging security threats; automate key processes; and improve your institution’s cybersecurity posture.

    Consider enhancing your firewall features or upgrading to a next-gen firewall to ensure the traffic traversing your firewall is truly being evaluated and inspected.

  7. Virtual Information Security Officer (VISO)
  8. A newer service that has grown in popularity over the last year is the Virtual ISO or VISO role. While services like this have been available for a while, this is the first year we have heard so much talk from community financial institutions. As the job of Information Security Officer (ISO) has become more involved the expertise needed has grown as well. These VISO services offer a way to supplement the internal staff with external expertise to accomplish the tasks of the ISO. Budgeting for a service like this becomes critical if one of the following is true:

    • No one else in the institution has the needed knowledge base and finding this knowledge set in your area is difficult or expensive;
    • Your current ISO does not have a background in the field or is wearing too many hats to do it well;
    • Your current ISO is likely to retire or leave due to predictable life change events; or
    • The role of ISO and Network Administrator or other IT personnel do not provide adequate separation of duties at the institution.

  9. Disaster Recovery (DR)
  10. Many institutions do not have a fully actionable or testable disaster recovery process. A verified DR process is a critical element of meeting business continuity planning (BCP) requirements. Therefore, this can be a significant reputational risk for the financial institution, if not done correctly. If your institution hasn’t completed a thorough and successful DR test in the last 12 months, it is time to evaluate your current DR process. Using a managed site recovery service can ensure you have the proper technology and support to thoroughly test your DR plan and recover quickly in the event of a disaster.

    Budget season is a time to address needs and wants, but also a time to seek improvement or evaluate key changes for the new year and beyond. For example, moving your infrastructure to the cloud may not make sense for the coming year, but the insight gained by evaluating it this budget season improves your knowledge-base for when it is time to make that decision. As we conclude 2019, we hope these insights position your institution for a productive budget season and a successful 2020.