Matt Gunn, Managing Editor | TechComply

In less than a year, Microsoft is ending its support for Windows XP. That means a lot of banks and credit unions will have to upgrade operating systems in the next several months, or end up facing future vulnerabilities or support issues as Microsoft — and every other software vendor, for that matter — dedicate their attention to current operating systems.

For those who are moving forward with an upgrade, there are two primary options: Windows 7 and Windows 8. Largely, it comes down to the traditional versus the touch. Windows 7 is instantly familiar to anyone that’s been using Microsoft’s operating system since the old days. Windows 8, on the other hand, represents the biggest design overhaul Microsoft has undertaken since sometime in the 90s. Gone are the traditional desktop, Start menu, familiar controls and power settings. Here (for now) are Live Tiles, touch-based controls and a look taken straight from a smartphone. We’ve developed the above infographic to cover a few more of the similarities and differences between the two.

Windows XP users have until April 8, 2014 before Microsoft support ends. And based on our own independent research, which indicates one out of every three devices in America’s banks and credit unions are still running XP, that means the next six to eight months will be a busy time for upgrades.

 

 

 

One comment

  1. Windows 7 and Windows 8. Largely, it comes down to the traditional versus the touch. Windows 7 is instantly familiar to anyone that’s been using Microsoft’s operating system since the old days. Windows 8, on the other hand, represents the biggest design overhaul Microsoft has undertaken since sometime in the 90s. Gone are the traditional desktop, Start menu, familiar controls and power settings. Here (for now) are Live Tiles, touch-based controls and a look taken straight from a smartphone.

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